Mit slægtsforskingsprojekt.

Notater


Match 1,651 til 1,700 fra 1,917

      «Forrige «1 ... 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 ... 39» Næste»

 #   Notater   Knyttet til 
1651 Tanner, Joseph Marion, second assistant general superintendent of Latter-day Saint Sunday schools, was born March 26, 1859, in Payson, Utah county, Utah.
He is the second but oldest living son of Myron Tanner and Mary Jane Mount, who when their son was about three years of age moved to Provo, where he received his earliest education in the public schools.
From his fourteenth to his seventeenth year he was an employee of the Provo Woolen Mills. He worked during the day in the factory and attended a night school organized at the Brigham Young Academy, under Dr. Karl G. Maeser. The class originally consisted of some twenty-six factory hands who gradually lost their interest in the studies, and he finally became the only student of the class which continued during the entire school year. It was during these night classes, at which he was the only student, that a sympathetic friendship sprang up between the boy and Dr. Karl G. Maeser-a friendship that became increasingly intimate during Dr. Maeser's life. At the age of seventeen he entered the academy as a regular student and was a member of its first graduating class in the year 1878, thus becoming one of the first teachers who had graduated from the institution. He remained at the academy as a teacher of various subjects, especially of mathematics, from his nineteenth to his twenty-fifth year. In 1879 he was engaged in engineering work in the construction of the Denver and Rio Grande railroad, and in 1882 was appointed city surveyor of Provo. In 1884 he left for a mission to Germany. In view of his profession as teacher he traveled extensively in America and Europe on his way to the missionary field, and was finally assigned to the Berlin conference. In the fall of 1885 he was transferred to Turkey for the purpose of opening a mission in the Sultan's dominion. During the spring of 1886 he visited the principal Oriental countries bordering on the Mediterranean, and especially the Holy Land, where an opportunity was discovered to open a mission among the German colonists who were colonizing Palestine under the idea that the chief feature of the gospel in these last days was that of gathering. A number of these Germans subsequently accepted the gospel and emigrated to America. After 3 1/2 years of missionary labor and travel in most of the countries of Europe and in the Holy Land, he returned home, reaching Utah in December, 1887. Owing to the ill health of Dr. Karl G. Maeser at that time, he took the latter's work in the Brigham Young Academy for the remaining part of the year. In the summer of 1888 he was elected president of the Brigham Young College at Logan, and the same year was appointed a member of the Church Board of Examiners, and the Church Board of Education at the same time conferred upon him the doctor's degree. After three years' presidency of the Brigham Young College, he resigned his position to take up a course of study in the East, and passed three years at Harvard University, chiefly in the study of law. On his return from Harvard he entered the practice of law in Salt Lake City, where in 1896 he became the first Supreme Court reporter under the new State government. While occupying that office he edited the first five volumes of the Utah State Reports. He was the same year elected president of the Agricultural College, at Logan, a position which he held for four years. Upon resigning his position as college president in 1900, he again entered the practice of law in Salt Lake City and became a member of the law firm of Ferguson, Cannon & Tanner. After a practice covering a period of ten months, in 1901, he was appointed deputy superintendent of State schools and later in the same year received the appointment of general superintendent of Church schools, to succeed Dr. Karl G. Maeser, who had recently died. Dr. Tanner, who had been a member of the Deseret Sunday School Union Board since 1896, was chosen second assistant superintendent of Sunday schools in 1901, and about the same time was appointed second assistant superintendent of religion classes. For more than twenty years Dr. Tanner has been a constant contributor to Church magazines, and at present is assistant associate editor of the "Juvenile Instructor," and edits "Current Topics" in the "Improvement Era." His studies and teaching during the past twenty-five years have covered a wide range, including, as they do, mathematics, languages, history, and law. His travels in Europe, Asia and Africa have extended to most of the historical fields of those continents and have been undertaken in pursuance of his interest in historical research. These accumulated experiences in educational institutions and in travel are particularly helpful to his work in the school and in the editor's chair.

LDS Biographical Encyclopedia, Andrew Jenson, Vol. 1, p. 709 
Tanner, Joseph Marian (I40230)
 
1652 Tenth Census of the United States, 1880. (NARA microfilm publication T9, 1,454 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C.
 
Kilde (S30)
 
1653 Tenth Census of the United States, 1880. (NARA microfilm publication T9, 1,454 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C. Kilde (S338)
 
1654 Tenth Census of the United States, 1880. (NARA microfilm publication T9, 1,454 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C. Kilde (S409)
 
1655 Tenth Census of the United States, 1880. (NARA microfilm publication T9, 1,454 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C. Kilde (S448)
 
1656 Teori:

Hun kan være det uægte barn (Kirstine) der 1684 fødes som datter af Kirsten Vorring og Christen Pedersen af Overgaard der har besovet hende.
Teori:

Hun kan være det uægte barn (Kirstine) der 1684 fødes som datter af Kirsten Vorring og Christen Pedersen af Overgaard der har besovet hende. 
Vorring, Kirsten Christensdatter (I24430)
 
1657 Terry was born January 4th, 1955, in the Salt Lake area to Stella Harvey Anderson and Aaron William Anderson. He grew up in a humble home with 3 brothers and 3 sisters where he developed a fierce loyalty to family. He was a natural athlete and baseball was his passion growing up. His talent for the sport got him scouted for the minor leagues; unfortunately a 30ft fall on a construction job squashed the dream he had of playing baseball professionally.
He was dedicated to the gospel of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints and served a mission in Bogota, Columbia. He took home a love of people and the Latin culture. Shortly afterwards he married Cynthia Mae Farish, his BYU sweetheart, in 1978 in the Los Angeles Temple. They raised 5 children, instilling in them the importance of family, hard work, and charity.
Terry was blessed intellectually and was a walking calculator. He loved reading, especially Louis L'Amour western novels. One of his endearing qualities was his ability to calmly connect with others. Anyone that knows Terry, knows that he was always there with a listening ear and a shoulder to cry on.
Terry’s favorite form of service was teaching youth whether it was on the field, in the chapel, or on the job. Another way he chose to serve was opening his home as a place of refuge to many, and he welcomed all with a Terry bear hug. Everyone was family to him.
One of Terry’s great accomplishments was renovating his childhood home and converting it from a small cottage to a large log home. It turns out that the greater accomplishment in this decade-long labor of love was that he taught all of his children how to work, how to do hard things, and the payoff that hard work can bring. Terry has said that his family is his greatest success...we certainly agree.
Terry passed away after a years-long battle with metastatic prostate cancer on September 15, 2017 in his home as his wife and sisters sang some of his favorite songs. His last breath was taken as they sang "Come Thou Fount of Every Blessing". 
Anderson, Terry Lynn (I100004)
 
1658 The 1852 John Tidwell Company "Council Point Emigrating Company Journal" includes the Coulson/Knapp family's name on their roster, but says they "Went on in a company before we started." Further research is needed to determine the name of the company they traveled with.
He traveled with his mother Lydia Ackerman Knapp Coulson. 
Knapp, William (I60153)
 
1659 The 30 March 1851 Census shows this family at Residence Brougham Street, Township Bishopwearmouth, Registration District Sunderland, Durham, England:
Martha English Head F age 47 widowed birthplace Tanfield, Durham occupation Lodging Housekeeper;
John English Son M age 26, unmarried, birthplace South Shields, Durham, occupation Mariner;
Thomas English Son M 20 South Shields, Durham, occupation Mariner;
William English Son M 16 South Shields, Durham, occupation Mariner;
Ann English Daughter F 13 South Shields, Durham;
John Myers Lodger M 35 Haverfordwest, Pembrokeshire, occupation Mariner ;
Hannah Dove Lodger F 17 Sunderland, Durham, occupation Dressmaker. 
English, William (I78487)
 
1660 The 30 March 1851 Census shows this family at Residence Brougham Street, Township Bishopwearmouth, Registration District Sunderland, Durham, England:
Martha English Head F age 47 widowed birthplace Tanfield, Durham occupation Lodging Housekeeper;
John English Son M age 26, unmarried, birthplace South Shields, Durham, occupation Mariner;
Thomas English Son M 20 South Shields, Durham, occupation Mariner;
William English Son M 16 South Shields, Durham, occupation Mariner;
Ann English Daughter F 13 South Shields, Durham;
John Myers Lodger M 35 Haverfordwest, Pembrokeshire, occupation Mariner ;
Hannah Dove Lodger F 17 Sunderland, Durham, occupation Dressmaker. 
English, Thomas Burdis (I78491)
 
1661 The 30 March 1851 Census shows this family at Residence Brougham Street, Township Bishopwearmouth, Registration District Sunderland, Durham, England:
Martha English Head F age 47 widowed, birthplace Tanfield, Durham occupation Lodging Housekeeper;
John English Son M age 26, unmarried, birthplace South Shields, Durham, occupation Mariner;
Thomas English Son M 20 South Shields, Durham, occupation Mariner;
William English Son M 16 South Shields, Durham, occupation Mariner;
Ann English Daughter F 13 South Shields, Durham;
John Myers Lodger M 35 Haverfordwest, Pembrokeshire, occupation Mariner ;
Hannah Dove Lodger F 17 Sunderland, Durham, occupation Dressmaker.

Find a Grave shows Martha Elizabeth Todd, Death Date 5 July 1863, Burial 1863 at Pioneer Heritage Cemetery, Spanish Fork, Utah, Utah.

A Custom Fact below shows Martha Elizabeth Todd was sealed to Elias Gardner, 13 July 1867, after her death 5 June 1863, and therefore never used the name Gardner.
 
Todd, Martha (I78483)
 
1662 The Ashby family traveled to the Salt Lake Valley with the Brigham Young Company in 1848. The Ashby family included Susan Hammond Ashby Noble and her children Benjamin, Elizabeth Rebecca Ashby Snow (wife of Erastus Snow), Harriett Maria, Nathaniel, Richard Hammond, William Hardin, Mary Jane, Emma Smith, and John Jefford.
Nathaniel drove a team for Brother Haven. Brigham Young Company (1848)

http://b11wiki.org/index.php/Nathaniel_Ashby_(1835-1882) 
Ashby, Nathaniel (I95877)
 
1663 The birth of William Angel is included in Mayflower Families Through Five Generations, Vol. 23: John Howland book (part 1, page 63).
Parents James Angel and Mary Brown
This series of book is considered the authoritative source of all Mayflower lineages through the 6th generation. So anything included in these books will be accepted by The Mayflower Society, and no further documentation will be needed to prove what is provided in these books. From Mayflower Association 
Angell, James (I38284)
 
1664 The birth of William Angel is included in Mayflower Families Through Five Generations, Vol. 23: John Howland book (part 1, page 63).
Parents James Angell and Mary Brown
This series of book is considered the authoritative source of all Mayflower lineages through the 6th generation. So anything included in these books will be accepted by The Mayflower Society, and no further documentation will be needed to prove what is provided in these books. 
Brown, Mary (I38041)
 
1665 The daughter of Samuel & Sarah (Baldwin) Buckingham of Milford, she was the first wife of Barnabas Baldwin. She died before Dec. 3, 1692 (when her father's will was written). Their children, Thomas & Barnabas Baldwin were remembered in her father's will. Buckingham, Sarah (I57178)
 
1666 The first John Hancock known to history was born about 1506 in Chesterfield, Derbyshire, England during the reign of Henry VII. He had a son and grandson both named Richard Hancock.

John Hancock’s (Decl of Ind.) great-great-grandfather, Nathaniel Hancock, was born in 1596.

He was a Puritan farmer and lived in Padiham, Lancashire, England. He emigrated from England with his wife Joan in 1634 and settled in Cambridge. Nathaniel’s son, Deacon Nathaniel Hancock, was born in America in 1638 and died in 1719. He also was a farmer and supplemented his income as a shoemaker and town constable. 
Hancock, Nathaniel I (I57162)
 
1667 The history of Amy Pritchard is included in the life of Elias Gardner, His Life and His Family - too large to place here. See book "Triumphant Banners, Higgins, Lowry, Tuttle, Gardner" by Kay Lundell. Pages 290-410. This book is on familysearch.org -Search - Catalog- Books. It is downloadable. Information for Benjamin Prichard is found on page382-383.
**********************************
"The first son, Benjamin, was born in Tryingham, Berkshire, Massachusetts, the other dozen in Great Barrington of the same County. This entire family of children lived well into the 1800's. Their father, Benjamin, served in the Revolutionary War, as a Private in Captain Charles Pond's Company from Milford, Massachusetts. They were part of Colonel R.J. Meig's Regiment. Mention is made of "Meig's Light Infantry, at Stony point" among the battles of this war." VaLoie R Hill (author) 
Prichard, Benjamin IV (I82293)
 
1668 The History of Elias Gardner, His Life and His Family - is too large to place here. See book "Triumphant Banners, Higgins, Lowry, Tuttle, Gardner" by Kay Lundell. Pages 290-41. This book is on familysearch.org -Search - Catalog- Books. It is downloadable. *
*************New addition to the Elias Gardner History. New York guardianship papers found for Elias Gardner at age 16. This record states that William Gardner was deceased by 1824.
ELIAS GARDNER - Correction and update on this history by Kay Lundell.
From the book “Triumphant Banner, Higgins, Lowry, Tuttle, Gardner, page 311
Quote 1: “Elias continued to live with his father’s family and learned the trade of Shoemaker, most likely from one of his uncles. “At the age of 14 years, Elias was working as an apprentice and by the age of 18 he was established in a shoemaker business. [EG93]
Quote 2: “Elias had studied in the school of dancing and had a great love for music. He was a dancing master and led the brass band for fears in New York says the tradition, THOUGH THE RECORDS INDICATE THAT HE REMAINED IN MASSACHUSETTS. He played the drums with unusual skill and fervor. The town’s people could always distinguish when Elias was playing the drums and were always pleased to hear someone say, ‘Gardner has the drums tonight.” [EG6: 93.”]
The following documents both corrects and substantiates these two traditions. (1) The first comes from “Abstracts of Wills, Administrations and Guardianships in NY State, 1787-1835.” This shows that Elias was 16 when he was apprenticed out. It also corrects the statement that he stayed in Massachusetts. At least for a time he was back in Vernon, New York. IT ALSO DOCUMENTS THAT WILLIAM GARDNER WAS DECEASED BEFORE 1824.
TRANSCRIPTION: PAGE 68 Letters of Guardianship:
GD [Guardian] OF ELIAS GARDNER, 16 YEARS OF AGE THIRD APRIL LAST, SON OF WILLIAM GARDNER, (PAGE 69) LATE OF TOWN OF VERNON, ONEIDA COUNTY, DECEASED. ON HIS PETITION, ALLOW OHEL SPELMAN OF TOWN OF VERNON, ONEIDA COUNTY TO BE HIS GUARDIAN. SEAL 13 JAN 1824. STAMPED "OHEL"
Since Ohel Spelman purchased a tannery in Vernon Center, Oneida, New York and Elias was living under his jurisdiction, it is most likely that he taught him in the art of shoemaking or at least completed his education.
Elias married when 18 years of age, just a couple of years after this document was made.
(2) In reading the history of Ohel Spelman, it states, …”The home of Lavina Clark Spelman, his mother, was large and a part of it was used for dancing for the youth of the neighborhood. It reads: “…The fiddlers’ dsais, and around the wall a circle of seats left a large space free for dancers.” A place when Elias could have taught dancing and played his drum. At least one of the places.
From the Book “Spelman Genealogy” From page 196
Publisher New York, Frank Allaben Genealogical Company, Pages 720, Call number 31833007247189 Digitizing sponsor Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center; Book contributor Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center; Collection allen_county; americana; Full catalog record MARCXML
THIS RECORD ADDED 9 JUNE 2017 BY Kay Lundell
**********************************************************************************************************
Elias Gardner was born April 2, 1807 in Vernon, Oneida County, New York, the son of William and Nancy Gardner. Sometime before Elias was two years of age he moved to the birthplace of his mother in Berkshire County, Massachusetts. There the father left his wife to support herself and four sons as best she could and was heard from no more for seven years. Elias grew up in the home of his grandmother and he always thought rather bitterly of his father for deserting his family.

At the end of the seventh year William returned to the city where he and his family had formerly lived seeking information as to their whereabouts. In the meantime Nancy had remarried thinking she would never see her husband again. William made inquiries at a blacksmith shop he had once owned, and was told by the owner that Nancy still lived in the old home but that now she was his wife. After hearing the story the blacksmith told William that he would inform Nancy that her former husband was in the city and if she still wanted to be married to him, he would step aside. But William, feeling that he had no right to the love of the woman whom he had deserted, went to the house to look upon her once more through a window then went away never to be heard from again. He left a present for her with her husband. Nancy always surmised that the gift, a beautiful shawl, came from William and she prized it highly. Shortly afterward she died.

Elias was just a young boy at this time. When he was eighteen years of age he married Harriet Smith. They were the parents of two children. On the 2nd of March, 1830 Harriet died and two years later he married Amy Pritchard. Elias joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, being baptized October 7, 1841. Elias was a leader during the early part of his life in a brass band in New York City. He lived in Nauvoo in 1846 and was endowed in the Nauvoo Temple January 8, 1846. He was a tenant at the Lucius Scovil house next to the present day Scovil Bakery in Nauvoo. This is south of the present Cultural Hall. He was a shoe maker in Nauvoo. He was a pioneer who came to Utah with Heber C. Kimball in 1848. He was active in the church and lived a faithful and full life with many wives and children, who loved and respected him for his many fine qualities. He passed away February 15, 1891 at Annabelle, Utah and was buried in a little place called Glenwood, Sevier, Utah. - Alveretta Gardner 
Gardner, Elias (I50731)
 
1669 The History of Jackson Co MI 1881: Lorenzo Badgley was born in Seneca Co NY, Oct 12 1812.
His parents were William M & Elizabeth (Frazer) Badgley, natives of New Jersey and of German descent. He came with his mother to Michigan Jun 8 1837 and settled in L 
Badgley, Lorenzo (I57143)
 
1670 The inscription on his gravestone reads, "Captain John Bridgham
Died July 31, 1840, Aet. 86 yrs, An officer in the Revolutionary War Lived (?) with his wife who lies beside him 57 years
~When the hours of life are past
And death's dark shade arrives at last
It is not sleep, it is not rest
Tis glory opening to the West.~" 
Bridgham, John Jr. (I95067)
 
1671 The maiden name of the wife of Wrestling Brewster is unknown.
Historical and academic researchers have failed to identify her maiden name or her parents.
Certain family records have suggested several different Marys (e.g., Mary Holland), but they can't be substantiated. 
Holland, Mary (I65821)
 
1672 The Nye Family of America has no proof of the Benjamin Nye's parents or origin. This later research refutes the original books and traditions that assign his parents. "Benjamin Nye moved to the location from Spring Hill during the 1670s when town offic Nye, Benjamin (I72886)
 
1673 The only information we have for Sine's death is a story told by Arnold Borgersen, grandson, is that she was killed in a duck hunting accident when her youngest child was about 2 years old. Pedersen, Sine (I78777)
 
1674 The Wentworth Genealogy: English and American in three volumes by John Wentworth (Little, Brown and Co., 1878) is the source of most of the Wentworth information. The author cites as his source "William Flower, Norroy King of arms of the College of Arms,...who compiled it in the year 1588, and it has ever since remained upon the records of the College, and been accepted...as authentic."

The only iffy part of the Wentworth genealogy is whether Elder William Wentworth of NH was indeed the son of William and Susanna (Carter) Wentworth. Author John Wentworth spent several pages of Volume 1 explaining all the circumstantial evidence for why he believed he was their son. The Marbury Ancestry, in an "IMPORTANT NOTE - " on page 26, says: "The old Wentworth Genealogy gives strong circumstantial evidence indicating the English parentage of the colonists, William Wentworth and Christopher Lawson ... Charles T. Libby, the great authority on New Hampshire genealogy, has recently accepted these findings as correct."

William Wentworth. b. abt 1584. Chr. on 8 Jun 1584 St. Peter at Gowts, Lincoln, Lincolnshire ENG.

They had three sons baptized at Alford in Lincolnshire but after the birth of their third son all records of William and Susanna at Alford cease. They moved to Rigsby in Lincolnshire, about two miles away, but very few records of Ribsby still exist. It is not known if they had more children or what became of William and Susanna. On 28 Nov 1614 William married Susanna Carter, in Alford, Lincolnshire ENG. 
Wentworth, William (I38120)
 
1675 The years continue to go by. At 5 the local school which had just finished a new grade school had a community activity. We all got to go and get a polio shot. Judy wanted her shot in one dose so they gave me one dose too, instead of a little in each bum cheek. I remember shuffling out to the car for the ride home because I couldn’t lift my foot off the floor, for the pain.
In fourth grade we had just come home from a summer in Montana. The dress I wore in the school picture in one Aunt June bought me. She wanted to give me a perm. The “in” style was a poodle cut, and I didn’t want one. So she bought me this beautiful dress with colored “cheerios” all over it. She told me it would be just perfect to have a hair style to go with the dress. So I got a nice new dress and a perm.
Daddy (Sherm) started a chain saw business in 1952. It progressed from the front porch to a little place in down town Juneau. I remember his chain saw tree (that he invented), and learned to help him by sharpening chain saw blades. Dad also went together with a company in California for a chainsaw mill he'd invented. I would lift it to show people that even a 10 year old girl could lift it. I helped him with that until I was about 14 and vanity arrived. What girl wants hands cut up from chain saw blades?
We went to 4-H and learned to bake and sew. Over the years I have sewed most of my party dresses and my wedding dress. My first party dress was a hand me down from Judy. We got nice dresses for the Green and Gold Balls at church. In fourth grade I met Loreen Oyler. We were best of friends and when her family fell apart we were able to have her come and live with us. There is more to tell on that but we will put it in her own story. I changed her name from Loreen to Lori and we did almost everything together. I went to her church with her and she went with me to mine. We sang songs together at school assemblies. We shared clothes and were a solid support to each other. After about a year the Social Services came and moved her because our house was too small and had too many children as well as other considerations we didn’t feel were justified as we didn’t want to lose her. She had become one of the girls.

After a year of school in Springville, Utah living with my father’s sister Pete (Phebe) I went to Idaho and helped Joy complete her boards from beauty school. When we finished there we went up and spent the rest of the summer with June and Ed at the ranch. Joy had a lot of fun playing with my hair. We decided that with my olive skin I didn’t make a very good red head, so I became a blonde. We rode horses and camped up Porcupine Canyon. I enjoyed the horse - Pete - very much and like riding him though I didn’t know how very well. No one ever taught us to be with horses and as much as I love them, I am also a bit afraid of them.. Judy arrived with a group who came South for Youth Conference in Vancouver, BC. They stopped at the ranch and left Judy and took Joy and me back to Alaska.

I graduated from Juneau-Douglas High School 22 May 1964. I worked as an office girl through out the summer and attended Sheldon Jackson Jr. College in Sitka, Alaska school year of 1964-65. I attended Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah winter of 1965-66 and after a few of life’s vicissitudes ended up at the Ranch again. I moved into an apartment down the hall from my Grandmother Pitman. It was a wonderful time getting to know her better. Whenever I would go out for job interviews she would dress me up. Fancy dresses and high heels and bows. I told her it was an interview not a party. Her reply was “ they’re men aren’t” I couldn’t argue because I got the job. It was a very friendly office and they all helped me get ready for my mission. I received a mission call December 1966 and left for the Northern Far East Mission in February 1967. Judy met me in Salt Lake City and went to the temple with me. I attended a week of classes with church leaders and went straight to Tokyo, Japan.
My first week was in Tokyo attending a missionary conference. President Adney Y. Komatsu was our Mission President. His wife told us it didn’t snow in Tokyo, so then of course it did. Sister Gushikin had just arrived from Okinawa and had never seen snow. She wandered all over the garden and looked up to see the snow, it was such a wonder to her. President Komatsu had to catch up with her to put a coat on her, she didn’t even realize it was cold.
My first area was Kyoto. The first week I caught a cold and we attended church in an old Japanese house, so I spent the day on a futon on the kitchen floor in front of a heater. What a way to begin anything. My first companion was Sister Janet Lang, from Las Vegas, Nevada. TK From Kyoto I transferred to Hiroshima, where the A-bomb was dropped in 1945. It had a very western feel to it and moves at faster pace than the other places in Japan I have visited. This is a picture of Hiroshima Jo (Hiroshima Castle) Most of the Jo’s you’d see in Japan look a lot like it. Some have more or less stories, but the basic shape is the same.
My first companion in Hiroshima was Marilyn Miller, 5’10”. She was always turning heads. One day a car with two gentlemen drove by, looked at her and drove into a ditch.. She went home and my next companion was Kiyoko Nakagawa who came back to American with me when my mission was over. From Hiroshima I transferred to Nagoya, and North Tokyo, Central Tokyo.At Central the building was an old Japanese Mansion.

Sister Tanner with large rock with red veins. Was offered $10,000. for this rock. The rules to build in Tokyo is a minimum of 5 stories. They have now built a new building which houses a stake center, a mission home, and other office space; these two items have been incorporated in the décor.

The large monument was created for a young girl who died from radiation sickness. According to tradition if you make 1,000 paper cranes you wouldl be healed. She made over 800 from when she got sick until she died. Now each year the school children make cranes and hang them in streamers to be hung under the center of the monument. While I was in Japan I helped to make 1,000 cranes to send my brother, John and Donna for their wedding.

I returned home from my mission February, 1969 and worked in Bozeman until July. Kiyoko Nakagawa came with me. Then she went back to Japan and I went to Hawaii and visited Elder William D. League who had returned from his mission in May 1969. We became engaged July 12, 1969 and married 1 August 1970 at Idaho Falls, Idaho. We were blessed with three wonderful children: Genji Tanner League 18 November 1972 - Hof, West Germany in Hof Stat krankenhouse. Married Mia Kerensia Wolfe 15 July 1995 Juneau, Alaska. Sealed 15 October 1996 - Seattle, Washington 
Tanner, Janet Elvene (I96770)
 
1676 There are records for a John Washburn born and baptized in 1551, who married Martha Stevens Timbrell. See source below
https://www.geni.com/people/John-Washbourne/6000000006442479168?through=6000000000796900574
https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/84004855/john-washbourne 
Washbourne, John (I66746)
 
1677 Things I remember about my Grandpa Hansen, some as related by grandma, dad and others.
He and grandma dry farmed west of Idaho Falls on an area that is now part of the government project early 1918,19 or there abouts. Dad was born in Howe but there is a picture of him on a cow at the dry farm when he was 1 or 2 years old. Grandma told of how she would sweep the dirt floor of the house they lived in on the dry farm.

Grandpa farmed in Howe for most of the years that I knew him. Again pictures show them living early on in the Bernice area, which is where dad went to grade school. They also farmed along the little lost river on the west side of the valley with grandpa's farm backing up to the foot hills towards Arco Pass.
Grandpa served as treasurer of the Blaine County Canal Co. for sometime as I remember lots of cancelled checks he kept in his office.
In the early 1960's grandpa had a heart attack and was forced to sell the farm. He and grandma moved to a small 2 bedroom home in Arco, Id. It was here that grandpa became active in the LDS church. Grandma told me the highlite of his life was being ordained a High Priest.
 
Hansen, John Moore (I12803)
 
1678 This brief sketch of the life of Dewite Barney was compiled by a niece, Grace Diane Barney Jessen, in 2018.

Dewite Barney was the third child born to James Henry and Effie Malinda Nebeker Barney. He was born in Annabella, Sevier County, Utah, on October 23, 1910. He had an older brother, Von, an older sister, Lora, and six younger sisters, Elma, Hazel, Reva, Vivin, Edith, and Martha.

Some sources give Dewite the middle initial "N" but his sister Vivin told Wendy Mathis that the initial was not part of his name.

Dewite grew up in Annabella and also lived in Burrville, Koosharem, and Sutherland when his father was teaching school there. After his father left teaching and became a farmer, Dewite helped with the farm, did chores, and worked in the sugar beet fields with his brother and sisters. They thinned, hoed, and topped beets for their father and for other people in nearby towns. In the evenings at home, the family enjoyed singing together and listening to their father play the harmonica.

Dewite's brother, Von, was three years older. He wrote: "Dewite was really headstrong and determined. He just wouldn't give in no matter what. He talked in his sleep and I had a lot of fun from that when he was a teenager. He would tell me everything. He also walked in his sleep until he was six or seven years old. Being the only boys in the family, we were very competitive in our early days. Maybe this was because he was so big and I was so small. Many times in our youth he was larger than I was. We started milking cows at the same time. I was about eight years old and he about five. I think he was probably bigger and stronger then than I was and was probably a better milker, too. We became very close in our later years."

Dewite's parents were active, faithful members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. Dewite was baptized a member on August 2, 1919, at age eight.

Vivin wrote: "When our parents would go to Richfield or 'town' as we called it, Dewite would always like to make a batch of his favorite candy, patience. He called it patience because it took so long to make. It was creamy, rich, light tan in color, and usually had walnuts in it. I can still visualize the big bread board with all those luscious drops of candy that couldn't be beat. When we were together in the evenings, it would be brought out from hiding for everyone to enjoy."

Dewite graduated from Richfield High School in May, 1929.

According to the Annabella News in the Richfield Reaper, Dewite had a part in a play that was presented in Annabella, Monroe, Joseph, and Glenwood, inMarch, 1931. It was called "It Pays to Advertise."

Von wrote about a show in which he and Dewite had parts: "Dewite was the villain and Leo Jensen, our new school teacher, was the hero. Donna and I captured the villain and fed him sleeping powder to hold him until the hero arrived. Of course, Dewite was supposed to fight the sleeping powder and would for just a minute and then would go for it like a trout after a fat worm. We kept trying to get him to resist more, but he just wouldn't do it . . . . Donna said, 'Don't worry, he'll fight when the time comes.' When we put the show on, I was holding him while Donna fed him. She let a little trickle into his mouth right on the start. The powder was Epsom salts and when Dewite tasted that, he put up a fight. Later, when the hero came, Dewite was supposed to awaken and make a dash for liberty and the hero was supposed to stop him. When Dewite made his dash for freedom, he dashed so hard that the hero couldn't hold him and both of them and the scenery all came tumbling down together."

Vivin said that Dewite and his Uncle Gene Barney would fight in boxing matches in the ring in Bingham. Uncle Gene and Uncle Leonard worked in the Bingham Canyon Copper Mine for at least a few years, even after Gene moved his wife Ada to Annabella. Uncle Gene would take Dewite to Bingham to fight and they would make quite a bit of money. Uncle Gene was a strong man, built a lot like his father. Dewite was a little taller, not fat, just a good build.

The Great Depression was going on in the 1930s and times were hard for most everyone. When Dewite was 24 years old, his father became ill, had surgery in Salt Lake City for a brain tumor, and died at home in Annabella on April 12, 1935. Lora was the only one of the Barney children married at the time. Seven months later, Dewite became the second one to get married.

Dewite married Norma T Larsen of Glenwood, Utah, on November 24, 1935, in Richfield, Utah. Norma was the second of ten children of Terrance and Ruth Kierstead Larsen.

At one time, Dewite and Norma lived in two rooms of his mother's home while she and her younger daughters lived in the other three rooms.

On July 8, 1937, the Annabella News said that Dewite and other men had returned home. They had been employed as sheep shearers during the summer.

Dewite and Norma became the parents of three sons and a daughter: James Hal (Jim) Barney, Joe Barney, Susan Barney, and Ted Lee Barney. When Jim, Joe, and Susan were young, the family lived in a house on Main Street in Annabella. The street is now known as 100 North. The children went to elementary school in Annabella and to junior high and high school in Monroe. In 1955, when Jim was in high school, the family moved to Sandy, Utah.

Dewite and Norma received their endowments in the Manti Temple on February 7, 1955.

Ted Lee was born in Murray in 1956. Two years later, the Barneys moved to Murray, Utah, in 1958. Dewite owned a service station in Murray.

In 1959, when Von's wife Grace was in the hospital in Salt Lake City, Dewite and Norma were very kind to both of them, giving Von a place to rest, taking mail to Grace, visiting her, and offering their continual love and support until her death.

The Barney children attended school in Murray. Jim, Joe, and Susan married and had families. Ted Lee was 22 years old when he died from injuries received in an automobile accident. He died February 18, 1979, in Salt Lake City and was buried in the Murray cemetery. This was a hard time for the family.

For many years, Dewite had sight in only one eye due to a welding accident. He died August 24, 1982, in Salt Lake City, of cancer at age 71.

Norma lived nearly another ten years. She died June 28, 1992, in Murray at age 77. She was buried beside Dewite in the Murray City Cemetery.
 
Barney, Dewite (I97181)
 
1679 This child is dead by few hours later as it was born.
Emergy baptisim

Besegl til forældre: @I307@ 
Gretschel (I5456)
 
1680 This File Gets Changed Every Single Week. Please Do Not Make any changes unless you attach a PRIMARY OR ORIGINAL source Justifying Your Change. Changing the file to match your GEDCOM does not count as an ORIGINAL source.
Let's see if we can go a whole month from now (August 24, 2016) without anyone decimating his family. Thanks so much. (March 2017 someone deleted his son, reasons unknown. May 18, 2017 someone moved all the children to the first wife.)
TIMOTHY HAD TWO WIVES, BOTH NAMED MARY. PLEASE DO NOT DELETE OR MERGE HIS WIVES OR REARRANGE HIS CHILDREN. The author C.C. Baldwin seemed to be very confused about the two Marys but his work has since been corrected by many authors. See sources below.
Find A Grave - many details on his findagrave.com listing are unfortunately inaccurate. He has no tombstone and his burial place is speculative.
For proof that his second wife's MAIDEN name was not MEPHAM, but that it was her MARRIED NAME from her first short marriage to John Mepham Senior, please see Timothy's will, where he mentions his step-son John Mepham.

Timothy Baldwin is mentioned in his father's will as the oldest son and was the executor of his father Richard Baldwin's will. A transcription of Richard's will can be found in the supplement to the Baldwin Genealogy, which can be found online here: https://archive.org/stream/baldwingenealogy1889bald#page/990/mode/2up (see page 990). This is a supplement to a genealogy written by C.C. Baldwin published in 1889. The full text of the original book can be found online (see Sources below). Richard's will is also transcribed in the full original book, see page 23.
We know several things about Timothy's father: he had a wife named Isabel and 7 children living at the time he wrote his will in 1630. Those children are Timothy (the oldest son), Joseph, Nathaniel, Mary, Hanna, Christian (a daughter), and Sara. According to the above sources, several of this Richard's children - all of his sons mentioned in his will - emigrated to America and settled in Milford, Connecticut in 1639. His youngest sister Sarah also came. I don't believe that oldest sister Mary came with her husband John Pratt; I don't know about Hannah or Christian, but I haven't seen any proof of such.
This family is also mentioned in some detail in Susan Woodruff Abbott's book, "Families of Early Milford, Connecticut" that can be found on ancestry.com. This book doesn't discuss Joseph, Timothy, or Nathaniel's parentage other than to say they were sons "of Richard and Isabell" (see page 27, 43, and 60). In general, settlers of Milford with the last name of Baldwin are discussed between pages 14 and 60 and span many generations. Timothy is mentioned on page 60.
I haven't yet been able to make anything other than a guess as to his birth year, although he was over 21 when his father wrote his will in 1630, putting a possible birth year at or before 1609 - probably closer to 1600 (his parents may have been married in 1598) as he was the oldest son, and it looks like at least one other son was already 21 at the time the will was written. In his will, Richard mentions the boys first - Timothy the oldest, then Nathaniel who is already 21, and then Joseph who is under 21, and then mentions his girls - Mary appears to be the only married child, and she is already old enough to have 3 of her own children. I would suspect that perhaps she might be the oldest child. And then I don't know if it would be Hannah or Nathaniel next, followed by an uncertain order of the 3 children who weren't yet 21 in 1630. So there is some information on birth order of Timothy and his siblings, and the rest has to be speculation (except that we do have a baptism record for sister Christian).
Sometime between 1633 when he proved his father's will in court and about 1637, Timothy and several of his family members moved to Connecticut/Massachusetts. His little sister Sarah married John Searle, Sr. in 1638 in Springfield, Massachusetts. Timothy first had a plot in the New Haven colony which he sold before going to Milford; he may or may not have ever lived in New Haven. See source below, "History of the Colony of New Haven."
According to page 403 of The Baldwin Genealogy, Timothy was one of "the first settlers [of Milford, Conn.] in 1639 and joined the church in 1643, with Mary his wife, who died July 31, 1647 ...That he was a brother of Nathaniel, appears from an entry from the long, narrow book of Milford records...Timothy lived for awhile in Guilford, Conn., about 1650, having married, March 5, 1645 (?), Mary Mepham, widow of John, of Guilford...[this is a typo. it should say March 5, 1649.] About 1651 or 1652 they sold the Mepham property and moved back to Milford." His known children include Mary, Hannah, Sarah, Abigail, Anne, and Timothy. Sources for these children are attached below. C.C. Baldwin here seems hopelessly confused about Timothy's two wives. This source should only be used with caution.
WHAT DO WE KNOW ABOUT TIMOTHY's WIVES?
We know that Timothy's first wife was named Mary. His second wife was also named Mary. There has been quite a bit of confusion about his two wives, and some secondary sources have perpetuated bad information. There is, on ancestry.com, a collection of indexed records from primary sources known as the Barbour Collection. The Barbour Collection of Connecticut Vital Records is an index to and transcription of most of Connecticut towns' vital (birth, marriage, death) records from the inception of the town to about the year 1850. There are two parts to the collection; a statewide surname index and a bound volume for each town. In this collection on ancestry.com there is a transcription of the original marriage record between Timothy and Mary Mopham, widow, of Guilford, Mar. 5, 1649. There is no original marriage record between Timothy and his first wife Mary, and consequently, we have had to look to other sources to find her maiden name. However, there are two pieces of information about Mary, the first wife, in the Barbour Collection. The first is that Mary, wife of Timothy, was admitted to the church March 5, 1643. The second was that she died July 21, 1647. There are many sources which identify her as Mary Welles, including this well-sourced book: Descendants of Gov. Thomas Welles of Connecticut, Volume 1, 2nd Edition, which can be found online (see Source below). This identification is made primarily through Governor Welles' will. There is a long discussion of the proof of the first Mary's maiden name in the book written by Donald Jacobus, "An American family : Botsford--Marble ancestral lines," source attached below. See page 30.
So, any children born before 1647 belong to his first wife Mary, and after 1649 belong to his second wife Mary. Mary (bapt. 2 April 1643), Hannah (bapt. Aug. 1644) and Sarah (bapt. Aug. 1645) belonged to Timothy's first wife Mary (Welles), and Abigail (bapt. Dec. 29, 1650), Anne (born July 1, 1655, died age 3 weeks) and Timothy (born June 12, 1658) belonged to second wife Mary (widow of John Mepham of Guilford, whose maiden name is unknown).
Timothy and his brothers are also mentioned In a book called the History of Milford, Connecticut, which can be found online (see Source below). Starting on page 7, there are 5 men with the last name of Baldwin who are mentioned in the first town meeting, held on November 20, 1639: Richard, Nathaniel, Timothy, Joseph, and John.
Timothy's widow Mary remarried after his death.
An indexed, typewritten copy of Timothy's will can be found in the book, "A Digest of the Early Connecticut Probate Records," which can be found online (see Sources below). The will was dated 31 January 1664/5. The text of his will is generally as follows: Timothy Baldwin of Milford do make this my last Will and Testament: I give to my eldest daughter Mary Smith, the wife of Benjamin Smith, Lands adjoyning Samuel Buckingham and John Lane. Item. I give to my daughter Hannah Baldwin œ50. Item. I give to my daughter Sarah Buckingham œ50. Item. I give to my son Timothy Baldwin all my houses, Lands and Meadows Lying in Milford that is undisposed of, to enter upon, but two thirds thereof until after the decease of my wife. I give to my three grand children, to each of them, a ewe sheep. Item. I give unto John Mappam, my wive's son, œ4 upon this condition, if he be obediant to his mother and carry dutifully towards her...." In 1664 he counted 3 grandchildren, likely Mary Smith, Sarah Buckingham, and who? I don't know - maybe unborn Hannah Smith? Or else we are missing a grandchild somewhere. His wife was sole executor. The inventory taken 6 Feb 1664/[5?] amounted to 529 pounds 18 shillings and 6 pence. (We know from this will that his second wife Mary had at least 1 son before her first husband died). I think it likely that Timothy helped to raise this stepson from his wife's first marriage. In all, it looks like he had 4 children and one step-son who lived to adulthood. Of these, only son Timothy could have passed on the family name, and it doesn't look like he had any sons who lived to adulthood.
There are a variety of sources for a death date for Timothy, which is complicated by the "double dating" method used in those days for the months of January, February, and March. Here is a rundown of the variety of opinions:
1. According to The Baldwin Genealogy, p. 403, Timothy died "the night following January 17, 1664/65."
2. According to An American family : Botsford--Marble ancestral lines, page 29, he died January 17, 1664/65, see page 29, even though in the very next paragraph he says his will was signed 31 January, 1664/5. I am pretty sure that isn't possible.
3. According to Families of Early Milford, Connecticut, page 60, Timothy died 17 January 1664/5.
4. A digest of the early Connecticut probate records, page 177, doesn't give a death date, but says his will was dated 31 January 1664-5, and was proven in court 2 March, 1664-5.
5. The Barbour Collection, which contains is a typewritten indexed copy of the Milford church record which mentions Timothy's baptism and death (see source below, Connecticut, Church Record Abstracts, 1630-1920) indicates he died 17 January 1664 (no double dating).
6. The book, "Descendants of Gov. Thomas Welles of Connecticut, Volume 1, 2nd Edition" on page 203 sums this date problem up nicely: "This 17 January 1664 death date is listed as part of the church membership list where it is appended to the note that Timothy joined the church, so it is not found in any list of deaths by date order. The 31 January 1664 date on which his will was written was taken from the probate court register book and not from the original will. Thus, there is no simple way of evaluating which date might have been incorrectly understood." 
Baldwin, Timothy (I57173)
 
1681 This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. This source citation points you to a current version of those files. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was created.
 
Kilde (S16)
 
1682 This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. This source citation points you to a current version of those files. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was created.
 
Kilde (S19)
 
1683 This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. This source citation points you to a current version of those files. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was created.
 
Kilde (S24)
 
1684 This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. This source citation points you to a current version of those files. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was created.
 
Kilde (S36)
 
1685 This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. This source citation points you to a current version of those files. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was created.
 
Kilde (S44)
 
1686 This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. This source citation points you to a current version of those files. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was created. Kilde (S55)
 
1687 This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. This source citation points you to a current version of those files. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was created. Kilde (S56)
 
1688 This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. This source citation points you to a current version of those files. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was created. Kilde (S58)
 
1689 This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. This source citation points you to a current version of those files. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was created. Kilde (S59)
 
1690 This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. This source citation points you to a current version of those files. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was created. Kilde (S70)
 
1691 This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. This source citation points you to a current version of those files. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was created. Kilde (S77)
 
1692 This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. This source citation points you to a current version of those files. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was created. Kilde (S83)
 
1693 This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Treefiles. This source citation points you to a current version of thosefiles. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed orchanged information since this source citation was created. Kilde (S60)
 
1694 This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Treefiles. This source citation points you to a current version of thosefiles. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed orchanged information since this source citation was created. Kilde (S69)
 
1695 This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Treefiles. This source citation points you to a current version of thosefiles. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed orchanged information since this source citation was created. Kilde (S80)
 
1696 This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Treefiles. This source citation points you to a current version of thosefiles. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed orchanged information since this source citation was created. Kilde (S85)
 
1697 This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Treefiles. This source citation points you to a current version of thosefiles. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed orchanged information since this source citation was created. Kilde (S100)
 
1698 This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Treefiles. This source citation points you to a current version of thosefiles. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed orchanged information since this source citation was created. Kilde (S108)
 
1699 This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Treefiles. This source citation points you to a current version of thosefiles. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed orchanged information since this source citation was created. Kilde (S393)
 
1700 This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry FamilyTreefiles. This source citation points you to a current version ofthosefiles. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removedorchanged information since this source citation was created. Kilde (S236)
 

      «Forrige «1 ... 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 ... 39» Næste»


Webstedet drives af The Next Generation of Genealogy Sitebuilding ©, v. 12.0.3, forfattet af Darrin Lythgoe 2001-2019.

Oprettet og vedligeholdt af John Lynge Copyright © -2019 Alle rettigheder forbeholdes. | EU-persondataforordningen.