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101 1900 Census shows William and Emma had been married 37 years giving them an estimated marriage year 1863, Emma was mother of 3 children with 3 living.
The 1910 Census shows Emma is the mother of 4 children with 2 living. Their daughter Sarah Edith Gardner 1878-1904 • L28G-974 had died in 1904. 
Rice, Emma (I50988)
 
102 1921 ~ 2007

Ruby Gardner Jensen exchanged mortality for immortality August 25, 2007.She was born the fourth of five children who claimed Samuel Adelbert Gardner and Loie Areva Hopper as their parents. She was born October 13, 1921 in Salem, Utah a descendent of Utah pioneers. She married her sweetheart, Albert W. Jensen, August 8, 1941 in Salem, Utah. Their union was eternalized June 17, 1960 in the Salt Lake Temple.

Mom was raised on a farm and knew the meaning of hard work. She attended beauty college and worked as a beautician and then turned to work in the arms industry during World War II. During the war, her first son, Bill, was born. After the war, they returned to the farm where her second son, Dan, was born. "How you going to keep them down on the farm after they have seen"Salt Lake? They returned to Salt Lake where her third son, Kent, was born.

Ruby was a valiant member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. She served faithfully in many positions, supported three sons on missions, and helped support seven grandchildren on missions. She worked for many years as the accounts payable supervisor for the Salt Lake Board of Education where she had many close friends, the lunch bunch, all of whom have preceded her in death. She retired in 1982 and spent many years traveling with her husband.

Mom said that she had a date with her beau and has now taken the next step on the path of eternal progression, returning to her father in heaven and the arms of her eternal companion, Albert. And now together, they are surrounded by their two grandsons, Little Dan and Tommy; her parents; brothers and sisters.

She is survived by her sons, Bill (Rexine), Dan (Bonnie), and Kent; grandchildren, Robert (Ellen), James (Aubrey), Bryan (Deanna), Jennifer, Jocelyn Bennion (Sam), Brandon, Brett, Linda Jean Robbins (Steven), Steven (Kimberlee); great-grand-children, Emily, Sarah, Laura, Rebekah, David, Ethan, Aidan, Brayden, Brielle, Alyson, Abby Lyn, Aubrey Lynne, Kailey Anne, Cody James, (new arrival to be announced in October), McKenna Lee, and Morgan Brooke; loving sister-in-law, whom she considered to be more like a sister, Erma Gardner, and sister-in-law, Louise; many nieces and nephews; loving neighbors and friends.

The family wishes to express our most sincere appreciation to the men and women at the Huntsman Cancer Hospital who provided such loving care to Mom.

Funeral services will be held Thursday, August 30, 2007, 11 a.m. at the Granger 14th Ward, 2101 W. 3100 S., West Valley City. A visitation will be held Wednesday at Larkin Mortuary, 260 E. South Temple from 6-8 p.m. and Thursday at the church from 9:45-10:45 a.m. prior to services. Interment, Salt Lake City Cemetery. 
Gardner, Ruby (I83232)
 
103 1st Earl Of Essex Cromwell, Thomas Sir (I58859)
 
104 2 different men have been given the same birth date/place & parents. One of them was later married in the same place where he was born (i.e., K8Q1-58C) and on that basis seems more likely to belong to this family & have this birth date than does THIS James Gardiner who married, instead, in MASS. I do not descend from either of these men, so I am leaving it alone. But for those who do descend from this family, be aware of this conundrum & the possible need for further research to solve it. Gardiner, Dr. James (I83276)
 
105 2. Ehe fuer Susanna Schmidt mit Andreas Strack.
 
Strack, Anderas (I29219)
 
106 23.11.1729 75J. 2m. 14T. alt.

Besegl til forældre: @I307@ 
Gretschel, Tobias (I29507)
 
107 242. Henry Died at Mobile. Judd, Henry William (I59942)
 
108 243. Maria Married John H. Cook of New Haven. Judd, Maria Mix (I59940)
 
109 244. Philip Samuel Lived in New Britain Conn 1850 Had a family. Judd, Philip Samuel (I59941)
 
110 245 Thomas S Graduated at Washington College 1831. Was a minister of the Episcopal church, in the State of New York. Judd, Thomas Stanley (I59939)
 
111 2nd wife of James Jens Mortensen. James and Ida Pease Mortensen met her. She helped Ida in the home. Family learn to love Elizabeth. During polygamy years, from family stories, it was Ida that encouraged James to take Elizabeth as wife in marriage.

MY MOTHER'S LIFE STORY - Elizabeth Mears Hawkins Mortensen
1 March 1867 - 22 January 1911
By Zetta Fern Mortensen Sanders (daughter)

Elizabeth Mears Hawkins Mortensen was born March 1, 1867 in Salt Lake City, Utah. Her father was Thomas Sunderland Hawkins and her mother, Elizabeth Mears Hawkins. She was born under the Covenant with her parents having been sealed and endowed in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City.

She says she remembered playing on the temple grounds when the temple had only stones cut ready for building. The family moved to Lehi, Utah and then to Arizona. They lived in Pinedale. Shortly before mother was seventeen years old, she went to work for Ida J. Mortensen, wife of James Mortensen, whom she later married. In telling about it, she said, "I wanted more clothes than father could buy, so my folks consented for me to go to work. Sister Mortensen needed a girl, so it was agreed that I go there to work. It was in the winter just after Christmas that James Mortensen, with his sister Mary came in the wagon for me. Father came out to the wagon as I got in and said, 'Well, Brother Mortensen, why don't you do like I did. I hired Elizabeth's mother to work for my wife, and married her'. I said, 'Why father!' Brother Mortensen said, 'Thanks Brother Hawkins, I think I will think about it'. By then I was so embarrassed!"

My mother told me about many cases of women asking her to marry their husbands in plural marriage. While working for Aunt Ida, when Ada was born one night, she felt impressed that she should marry Brother Mortensen, as she called him. The next morning he told her that he had been impressed to ask her to marry him. She told him she felt the same.

Arrangements were made during the summer of 1884 and in December, a party of people went to St. George. One wagon in the company was drawn with a team of mules. The driver was my mother. Father drove a buckboard with his first wife and little family riding in it. My mother Elizabeth and father James were married December 12, 1884 in the St. George Temple.

They made their home in Taylor, Arizona. They lived there about two years and then the persecution was so bad for polygamists that my Grandfather Hawkins took his families and moved to Mexico.

To remove trouble from my father, my mother took her baby 'girl, Alice and went with her father's families to Mexico.

The Hawkins' settled in Colonia Juarez. In Mexico, mother helped in any way she could. She gathered straw in the grain season and wove straw hats that she traded to other Colonists in Mexico. She knitted, crocheted, embroidered, hooked rugs, made candles, raised bees, did gardening and raised chickens. She made delicious butter and knew how to store it for use when milk and butter were scarce. She made a lovely graham bread .... the best I have ever eaten.

Her motto was "An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure". Her life was guided by the principle. She was helpful with the sick, but she tried hard to keep us all well. She was really ahead of her time on health rules. She learned nursing from my grandmother Hawkins. I guess most of the things she knew was learned from her mother as she had no chance to go to high school or college.

She read such books as the current church magazines, Book of Mormon, Bible, Doctrine Covenants, Voice of Warning, and a doctor book. She also read the American Mother's Magazine and the Deseret News.

She worked faithfully in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints when she could and when health would permit. Father followed her to Mexico two or three years after she went.

My brother Jesse was born in Colonia Juarez, August 29, 1890. Mother had hived two swarms of bees and done her Saturday cleaning when a cloudburst came and my brother was born about 1:30 P.M. Alice was about five years old and she did not fancy the little intruder, but later she became very devoted to him. Mother buried her next to three babies before they were two years old when Alice was accidentally shot and killed August 13, 1897. Mary, the baby just older than me died August 1898 and I was born the following March.

My mother was very fond of me and many say she spoiled me, but we were constant companions until her death, when I was almost twelve years old.

Elizabeth Mears Hawkins Mortensen was gray-eyed, her hair was gray and she was five feet four inches tall----weighed about 125 pounds. She was quite slender even though she had given birth to nine children. She was a good mother, faithful wife and a good neighbor. She loved the gospel with all her might. Her Patriarchal blessing said she would rise on the morning of the first resurrection and I believe she will.

Had mother lived two more months, she would have been exactly 44 years old. On January 22, 1911, she was shot in the back by some banditos at Guadalupe, Mexico and was buried at Colonia Dublan. The last word she spoke in this life showed she was thinking of her children's welfare.

In her short life, she had lived in two states of the United States, Utah , Arizona and Chihuahua in Mexico.

Elizabeth Mears Hawkins Mortensen gave birth to nine children, buried three before they were three years old, lost one at age eleven by an accidental gun blast and the child fell dead in her lap. She hived bees, tended a drive-on scale, told the lumber freighters where to unload the lumber for my father's lumber yard, knitted socks for some wealthy Mexican officials in Casas Grandes, and when the branch was organized at Guadalupe, she became secretary, treasurer and librarian for the Relief Society.

My father bought Uncle Willard's place for her and it had a lot of young fruit trees, strawberries, rose bushes, black willow pomegranates, berries and grape vines. This was her last home, close to the school and the church. She was happy there. She made our clothes and taught me how to sew my own when I was only nine years old. Jesse and my mother worked in the garden and field. Jesse went to Juarez to school in the fall of 1910.

We loved Christmas time and Thanksgiving when the older children from the other family came to spend the holidays.

James Madison lived in a little old house back of ours. He took care of the chickens. Mother milked our cow, churned butter, canned fruit and vegetables, made soap, and other household duties, but she always had time to go to all the church activities. She taught a Sunday School class and a Primary class. She also took time to visit the sick. She did her best to go to as many of the graves as she could on Memorial Day. She was loved and respected by everyone who knew her. She never lived in a house with indoor plumbing--no electricity, no gas. She cooked on a wood stove, bathed in a galvanized tub. The water had to be pumped from the well with a pitcher pump and heated.

Saturday morning the wash boiler was put on the stove and filled with water for baths and house cleaning. Shampooing hair and rolling hair in curlers were part of Saturday's preparation for Sunday (the Sabbath). That was the time the boys' hair was cut. Anything we could do with our limited means was done to make Sunday a real day of worship and rest. In my mother's time, if you wanted bread, cake or cookies, you had to make them because there were no supermarkets to go get things. A calf was butchered when the weather was cold enough to keep it from spoiling and the neighbors helped use it up as there were no ice boxes or electric refrigerators.

Chicken for Sunday was quite common as it could be cooked and used right away.

My mother usually had white flour and graham flour and cornmeal. She let me take over making the yeast bread when I was nine years old. Our bread was mostly raised yeast bread but we had "Johnny cake", or corn bread and sometimes pancakes for breakfast. We usually had molasses and honey which she kept in gallon cans. If we ate molasses too often, we got canker sores in our mouths. The honey was extracted from honeycomb
 
Hawkins, Elizabeth Mears (I59496)
 
112 3. Anna, born Dec. 24th, 1759, bap. Dec. 30th, 1759, m. No. (174.)

174. "ASAHEL HART," to church Jan. 26th, 1783, son of Joseph, of Northington, now Avon, and Anna Barnes, of Thomas, of Southington, his wife, born May 12th, 1754, bap. May 25th, 1754, Rev. E. Booge, officiating, at Northington. He bought of Elisha Hart, 1791, his new house which Ezekiel Wright built, on Farmington road, near Bass River, with two acres and ten rods of land, where he lived some years; he m. No. (224.)

224.'ANNA, wife of Asahel Hart," to church April 1st, 1787, daughter of No. (200) and No. (78,) born 1759, bap. Dec. 30th, 1759, m. No. (174;) she died Feb. 22d, 1803, aged 44.

He was a brick-mason by trade and occupation, a stirring, lively man, naturally impulsive. After some years he moved to the foot of " Osgood Hill," on the same road. His wife died Feb. 22d, 1803,

when he m. second, Jan. 11th, 1804, Chloe Booth, daughter of Nathan, sen.; she died Feb. 10th, 1807, aged 44;

when he m. third, July 29th, 1807, Widow Prudence Gridley, of Avon, widow of Stephen; her maiden name, Park. Mr. Hart died at North Granby. Gridley, her former husband, was drowned at the whirlpool below Farmington bridge; he had swam the river once safely, when a bet was offered that he could not do it again, and he was drowned in the attempt.

THE HART CHILDREN.

1. Anna, born, bap. May 18th, 1783, m. Samuel Cossett, of Granby.

2. Beula, born, bap. May 18th, 1783, never married, died at Simsbury.

3. Asahel, jun., born, bap. Oct. 3d, 1784, m. in Ohio; returned and drowned in Farmington.

4. Joseph, born, bap. Oct. 28th, 1787, m. Sophrona Hart; second, Laura Buel.

5. Eunice, born, bap. Jan. 3d, 1790, m. Sept. 15th, 1818, Chauncey Clark.

6. Azuba, born, bap. Sept. 16th, 1792, m. Apheck Woodruff, Nov. 9th, 1809.

7. Elizabeth Norton, born, bap. May 14th, 1795, m. Wakeman Stanley.

8. Adna Thompson, born 1796, bap. May 28th, 1797, m. Lydia Woodruff.

9. Hannah Day,.born March 20th, 1799, bap. May 19th, 1799, m. Ozem Woodruff, of Avon.

10. Ezra, born, bap. May 17th, 1801, unmarried, occasionally insane.

Memorial. Genealogy, and ecclesiastical history [of First church, New Britain, Conn.] To which is added an appendix, with explanatory notes, and a full index ... By Alfred Andrews ...
Andrews, Alfred, 1797-1876. 
Hart, Asahel (I59689)
 
113 3. Anna, born Dec. 24th, 1759, bap. Dec. 30th, 1759, m. No. (174.)

174. "ASAHEL HART," to church Jan. 26th, 1783, son of Joseph, of Northington, now Avon, and Anna Barnes, of Thomas, of Southington, his wife, born May 12th, 1754, bap. May 25th, 1754, Rev. E. Booge, officiating, at Northington. He bought of Elisha Hart, 1791, his new house which Ezekiel Wright built, on Farmington road, near Bass River, with two acres and ten rods of land, where he lived some years; he m. No. (224.)

224.'ANNA, wife of Asahel Hart," to church April 1st, 1787, daughter of No. (200) and No. (78,) born 1759, bap. Dec. 30th, 1759, m. No. (174;) she died Feb. 22d, 1803, aged 44.

He was a brick-mason by trade and occupation, a stirring, lively man, naturally impulsive. After some years he moved to the foot of " Osgood Hill," on the same road. His wife died Feb. 22d, 1803,

when he m. second, Jan. 11th, 1804, Chloe Booth, daughter of Nathan, sen.; she died Feb. 10th, 1807, aged 44; when he m. third, July 29th, 1807, Widow Prudence Gridley, of Avon, widow of Stephen; her maiden name, Park. Mr. Hart died at North Granby. Gridley, her former husband, was drowned at the whirlpool below Farmington bridge; he had swam the river once safely, when a bet was offered that he could not do it again, and he was drowned in the attempt.

THE HART CHILDREN.

1. Anna, born, bap. May 18th, 1783, m. Samuel Cossett, of Granby.

2. Beula, born, bap. May 18th, 1783, never married, died at Simsbury.

3. Asahel, jun., born, bap. Oct. 3d, 1784, m. in Ohio; returned and drowned in Farmington.

4. Joseph, born, bap. Oct. 28th, 1787, m. Sophrona Hart; second, Laura Buel.

5. Eunice, born, bap. Jan. 3d, 1790, m. Sept. 15th, 1818, Chauncey Clark.

6. Azuba, born, bap. Sept. 16th, 1792, m. Apheck Woodruff, Nov. 9th, 1809.

7. Elizabeth Norton, born, bap. May 14th, 1795, m. Wakeman Stanley.

8. Adna Thompson, born 1796, bap. May 28th, 1797, m. Lydia Woodruff.

9. Hannah Day,.born March 20th, 1799, bap. May 19th, 1799, m. Ozem Woodruff, of Avon.

10. Ezra, born, bap. May 17th, 1801, unmarried, occasionally insane.

Memorial. Genealogy, and ecclesiastical history [of First church, New Britain, Conn.] To which is added an appendix, with explanatory notes, and a full index ... By Alfred Andrews ...
Andrews, Alfred, 1797-1876 
Kilbourn, Anna (I59690)
 
114 3. Ehe fuer Susanna Schmidt, 1. Ehe fuer Balzer Gretschel.

Besegl til forældre: @I307@ 
Gretschel, Balthasar Rusticus (I29015)
 
115 47 Jahre 12Wochen

Besegl til forældre: @I307@ 
Gröger, Martin (I29194)
 
116 53. WILLIAM Judd Esq. son of Wm. Judd of Farmington married in 1765 Elizabeth Mix daughter of Ebenezer Mix of West Hartford. He was a lawyer, an officer in the revolutionary army and for years before his death a conspicuous and leading man in the democratic party of Connecticut. He died at Farmington Nov. 13, 1804. I have his printed address of 23 pages to the people of Connecticut dated Nov. 8, 1804 only 5 days before his death He was usually called Major Judd.
Children
113 William Samuel born Jan. 10, 1766
114 Bortiva 1767 Died 1774
115 William Died 1776
116 Elizabeth Olive b Married Wm T. Belden, Lived at Poughkeepsie NY
Thomas Judd and his descendants p19, p20 1858
By Sylvester Judd 
Judd, William (I59933)
 
117 6. Azuba, born, bap. Sept. 16th, 1792, m. Apheck Woodruff, Nov. 9th, 1809.

Memorial. Genealogy, and ecclesiastical history [of First church, New Britain, Conn.] 1867 p189 By Alfred Andrews 
Hart, Azuba (I59667)
 
118 6. Henry, was an early emigrant to New England, and the ancestor of the Camb. family of Prentice. He was a proprietor, and perhaps a resident. of Sudbury, but settled here before 1643. He sold his Sudbury lands to John Goodnow 6 Feb. 1648. His w. Elizabeth d. here 13 May 1643; and he m. Joane (Joanna)--, by whom he had Mary, b. 25 Nov. 1644, m. Nathaniel Hancock 8 Mar. 1663-4; Solomon, b. 23 Sept. 1646; Abiah, b. 22 May 1648; Samuel, b. 3 Aug. 1650; Sarah, m. John Woodward; Henry; all these, except Abiah, were living, and named in a conveyance of real estate 31 Dec. 1713. Henry the f. was a husbandman, and d. 9 June 1654; his w. Joanna m. John Gibson 24 July 1662.

source: http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Perseus%3Atext%3A2001.05.0228%3Achapter%3D41&force=y 
Prentice, Henry (I57153)
 
119 6. Henry, was an early emigrant to New England, and the ancestor of the Camb. family of Prentice. He was a proprietor, and perhaps a resident. of Sudbury, but settled here before 1643. He sold his Sudbury lands to John Goodnow 6 Feb. 1648. His w. Elizabeth d. here 13 May 1643; and he m. Joane (Joanna)--, by whom he had Mary, b. 25 Nov. 1644, m. Nathaniel Hancock 8 Mar. 1663-4; Solomon, b. 23 Sept. 1646; Abiah, b. 22 May 1648; Samuel, b. 3 Aug. 1650; Sarah, m. John Woodward; Henry; all these, except Abiah, were living, and named in a conveyance of real estate 31 Dec. 1713. Henry the f. was a husbandman, and d. 9 June 1654; his w. Joanna m. John Gibson 24 July 1662.

source: http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Perseus%3Atext%3A2001.05.0228%3Achapter%3D41&force=y 
Savage, Joanna (I57197)
 
120 68 Jahre 3 Monate 6 Tage.
 
Satke, Thomas (I29346)
 
121 7th Lord of Berkeley Berkeley, Sir Maurice Knight (I41431)
 
122 Lancashire Anglican Parish Registers. Preston, England: Lancashire Archives. Kilde (S650)
 
123 Marriage Records. Illinois Marriages. FamilySearch, Salt Lake City, UT. Kilde (S714)
 
124 Marriage Records. Montana County Marriages. County courthouses, Montana. Kilde (S724)
 
125 Utah, County Marriages, 1887-1937. Salt Lake City, Utah: FamilySearch, 2013. Kilde (S268)
 
126

"New Jersey Deaths and Burials, 1720–1971." Index. FamilySearch,Salt Lake City, Utah, 2009, 2010. Index entries derived from digitalcopies of original and compiled records.

 
Kilde (S639)
 
127

Naturalization Records. National Archives at Boston, Waltham, Massachusetts.


A full list of sources can be found here.

 
Kilde (S850)
 
128

County Marriage Records. Arizona History and Archives Division, Phoenix, Arizona.

 
Kilde (S803)
 
129

Iowa Department of Public Health. Iowa Marriage Records, 1880–1922. Textual Records. State Historical Society of Iowa, Des Moines, Iowa.


Iowa Department of Public Health. Iowa Marriage Records, 1923–37. Microfilm. Record Group 048. State Historical Society of Iowa, Des Moines, Iowa.

 
Kilde (S819)
 
130
  • Florida Department of Health. Florida Marriage Index, 1927-2001. Florida Department of Health, Jacksonville, Florida.
  • Marriages records from various counties located in county courthouses and/or on microfilm at the Family History Library.
 
Kilde (S878)
 
131 A Branch of the Lathrop Family Tree page 27; SOLOMON MOSS; born July 9, 1690, and married January 28, 1714 to (1) Ruth Peck. His second wife was named Sarah. He had ning children by his first wife and three by his second; Jane, Martha, Susanna, Dani Moss, Solomon (I73391)
 
132 A short History of Abigail Howe taken from the May 1955 Juvenile Instructor
Abigail was born in Hopkinton, Massachusetts on 3 May 1766. She was descended from intelligent, able, and often illustrious, frequently titled ancestry, both in England and America. The Howes loved books. Nabby was one of seven sisters. All were gently vivacious and attractive. They sang duets, folk songs, and were in the choir. Nabby had blue eyes and wavy brown hair with ringlets across her forehead. At nineteen she married John Young, a Revolutionary War soldier. Nabby was a born reformer and many mothers asked her to visit and counsel their daughters when they were about to be married.
She lived much in a covered wagon, moving from place to place and bearing eleven children. All but one were converted to the church and remained faithful. The family lived in Hopkinton for 16 years. Abigail died at the age of 49 when Brigham was 14 years old. He said of her that no woman ever lived who was better. “My mother taught her children to honor the name of the Father and Son and to reverence the Holy Bible.” She said, “Read it, observe its precepts, and apply them to your life as far as you can. Do everything that is good, do nothing that is evil, and if you see any person in distress, administer to their wants. Never suffer anger to arise in your bosom, for if you do you may be overcome by evil.”
 
Howe, Abigail Nabby (I64942)
 
133 A SKETCH OF THE LIFE OF MAREN HANSEN JENSEN
(as presented at a meeting of the “Daughters of the Utah Pioneers.”
Written by her daughters, Martha Rees and Lana Alvord.)
Taken from pages 35-38 of the book
“Mads Christian Jensen Ancestors and Descendants 1600-1960”

In the early part of the nineteenth century there lived in Borglum Hjorring Amt., Denmark, a worthy couple named Hans Andersen and Rjearsten Hansen. They were a very religious couple, belonging to the Lutheran Church.

The father was a miller by trade, and also owned a distillery, having plenty of this world’s goods. Two boys and four girls came to bless their home. Maren, the subject of this sketch, was born February 10, 1826, and was the oldest of the girls.

They gave their children the best education the schools then afforded, and although they always hired help in the home, the children were taught to work. When Maren was in her teens she was sent to learn fancy weaving, such as fine bedspreads, tablecloths, etc. at Elling. Elling is a little village about 25 miles from Borglum. Here there was a lady who taught this art to young girls. While there she met Mads C. Jensen, the son of the lady who taught weaving. Their friendship ripened into love and they were united in marriage in the month of May 1845, at the home of Maren’s parents.

Near their home lived an old couple who desired this young pair to live with them and take care of them while they lived and they would deed their home to them. The young Jensens tried to do this but the little old woman was so very disagreeable that Maren, being of a peaceful disposition, felt she could not live in such an atmosphere of contention. She went home and told her father that she could not live in such an atmosphere of contention. She went home and told her father that she could not live with them longer. Her father then bought the home from the old couple and gave it to his daughter and her husband. This was their home for as long as they lived in Denmark. Here they lived happily with their relatives and friends until the Gospel message came to them.

They were baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, August 17, 1851. Although they felt a joy unspeakable within their own souls, for they knew they had found the “Pearl of Great Price,” yet none of their relatives received the message, and of course, looked upon them as poor, deluded beings. Their once kind friends and neighbors now turned to bitter enemies. They stayed in their native land one and one-half years after joining the church, and during that time endured much persecution.

Having so much loftier and higher ideals of life and living, they could no longer be happy where they were, so they decided to gather with the Saints in America. They sold their home and all other earthly possessions and on November 5, 1852, bade goodby to all their loved ones and went to Copenhagen, preparatory to emigration. They had five children born to them in their native country, but just before leaving, death entered their home and took from them their baby girl, who was a little more than a year old. This was a great sorrow to them, especially to the tender hearted mother, and formed a new tie to bind them to their native land. But the call of truth was greater than all else, and in December they left Copenhagen and crossed the North sea to England, from which place they set sail for America with the first company of the Mormon emigrants to leave Scandinavia. They landed sometime in March 1853. The mother was seasick during most all of the voyage. When crossing the North Sea she was seen one day with her head over the railing and when her husband tried to find her he could not see her any place. Some sailors told him they had seen her by the railing, and they thought, perhaps, she had fallen over board. He spent a very anxious night but found her the next morning in the ship’s kitchen. The cook had seen her by the railing also, and had taken her into the kitchen. It was a happy reunion, especially for the husband, to find that she was still alive.

The voyage from England to America lasted nearly three months. All they had to eat during the voyage was boiled barley, split pea soup, very little seasoning, and hard sea biscuits. They gave the children one sea biscuit and a cup of split peas between two of them, but the mother being sick, they had her allowance. For eleven weeks and three days they did not have a drop of water, only what they brought with them. Before landing they were called to part with another of their little ones, a boy of about four years who was buried in the Gulf of Mexico.

Soon after landing in America they began the journey across the plains, by ox team. Before the journey was ended they were called upon to part with most all of the treasures they had brought with them, the mother even taking the earrings from her ears. They endured, uncomplainingly, may hardships and privations during this long, hard journey. Their little children walked all of the way across the plains, and the mother walked all of the way except one week while she was confined to her bed. On the twenty-fourth of July she gave birth to a son, whom they named Denmark. When the baby was three days old* they were fording a stream of water. As they were going up a steep embankment the chain broke and let the wagon drop back into the stream. The box began floating off the wagon when four strong men jumped into the stream and held the box in place while the chain was mended and the wagon was pulled out of the river.

The bedding as well as everything they had on was water soaked. Some of the sisters had some dry clothing for her and the baby when they reached shore and neither of them took cold. Surely the Father’s blessings were with them through all their difficulties and trials which only consumed the dross and refined the gold within their souls.

When baby Denmark was a week old, a man who was travelling with them broke his leg. Brother Jensen said he did not know what to do with him, as they had only room for one bed, and his wife needed the bed, but she told him she was able to walk. So she gave her bed to the man and walked all the rest of the way to Utah. Her children were happy when mother could walk with them again. What a noble example of self-sacrifice and faith--two wonderful traits developed by those great souls whom God called to establish his latter day work. They arrived in Salt Lake City September 28, 1853 happy that their long journey was ended and that they were gathered with the Saints of God. After staying in Salt Lake a short time they went to Kaysville where Brother Jensen built a mill for Brother Winel. Here they lived in a dug-out close to the mill and were very comfortable those long winter nights during the winter months. Their little room was warm. They had a few chickens and a cow and Brother Winel furnished them with potatoes, flour, etc. They were very happy and contented in this humble place after their recent privation and hardships. They greatly appreciated the Gospel truths and enjoyed meeting with the Saints.

In the Spring they moved into a tent on a piece of land where they planted corn and other garden crops, but the grasshoppers took it all, so their patience still had to be tried and tested. What a great truth the poet Shakespeare writes when he says, “Endurance is the crowning quality and patience all the passion of great hearts.” For truly this is the school that the Father takes all of His choicest souls through. In the fall they moved back to Salt Lake City where they stayed during the winter. In the spring of 1855, the family moved to Weber where Brother Jensen worked in the mill until fall when they moved to Ogden. Here another baby girl came to bless their home. The next winter was known as the hard winter for the early settlers of Utah, and they with many others learned what the pangs of hunger are, along with other privations. The following spring they moved back to Weber where Brother Jensen worked in the mill during the summer months. About this time a great scare came to the people of Utah. Word came that Johnston’s Army had been sent to destroy them and their homes. We can imagine what consternation this would cause after the cruel drivings and persecutions they had suffered in the East. Now when they thought they had found refuge where they could build up peaceful homes and worship God as they desired without molestation, this great fear bore down upon them.

In the Fall, Brother Jensen with other brethren, were called to go to Echo Canyon to keep back the army. The day he left, Sister Jensen gave birth prematurely to a baby boy who lived only five days.

Soon after Brother Jensen returned home he was called by President Lorenzo Snow, of Box Elder Stake, to move to Brigham City and run the Flour Mill at that place. They moved there in February of 1857. Sometime before this, Brother Jensen had married another wife, who now had two children. A few months after they moved to Brigham City the call came to move south. The two wives moved with the rest of the Saints, but Brother Jensen remained in Brigham City to grind up what wheat they had, as they did not know when, if ever, they would return. They came back in August of the same year. From that time on they made their home in Brigham City.

While living here six more children came to add more happiness to their home, making fourteen in all, seven boys and seven girls, whose names are Maren, Hans Christian, Andrew Christian, James Christian, Rjearsten Marie, Denmark, Sarah, Joseph, Rebecca, Eliza, Mads Christian, Isaac H, Martha and Valana. Five boys and two girls preceded the parents to the spirit world. Some years after moving to Brigham City their son, Andrew Christian, a boy of nineteen years, was sent with some other young men back east to purchase a threshing machine. One evening when guarding the cattle, while the others ate their supper, some Indians came and killed him, taking his boots, belt, pistol and hat, also some of the riding horses. Of course, he had to be buried out there on the Plains in a lonely grave. This sad news was a great sorrow to his mother. She never afterward could talk about it herself, and if others would mention it, tears would come to her eyes and she would leave the room. Besides raising her own children she also raised another son of Brother Jensen’s, Hyrum S., whose mother died soon after his birth. He never knew any other mother and was treated as one of her own children.

Sister Jensen was a home women. She loved her home, her husband and her children, and was extremely sympathetic and kind to them. She stood faithfully by her husband in whatever came to them, and although she endured many hardships, deep sorrows and trails, in it all she felt that God was good, for she had His spirit to strengthen her and learned, as all great souls learn, who take their difficulties in the right spirit, that every sorrow borne uncomplainingly brings us one step higher in the rounds of progression and leads us nearer to the Giver of all good. She was a faithful, consistent Latter Day Saint, and taught her children the truths for which they sacrificed so much. They are all faithful workers in the Church, ready to obey any call made of them. She had a big heart and kept her home open to the Saints that came from her native land, and many found a hearty welcome and a good meal in her home.

Sister Jensen was well educated and learned the English language remarkably quick. She was a great reader and understood the Gospel well. She had a good memory and kept well posted on the topics of the day. She often made the remark that she would rather do without a meal a day than be without the Deseret News in her home. Although she was not a public spirited woman, being perfectly content to live quietly in her home, feeling that woman’s greatest mission is to raise noble sons and daughters. Yet, when the Fourth Ward Relief Society was organized, she was chosen treasurer, a position she faithfully filled for several years. She was also chosen to be one of the first Relief Society teachers, a position she held almost up to the time of her death.

Although she left all her own sisters back in her native land, yet she found true sisters is the homes of her neighbors, and she was a true sister to them, for perfect love existed between them. They never had a disagreement that couldn’t be solved satisfactorily and were always happy to help each other in times of sorrow and difficulty.

She was called to part with her beloved husband July 11, 1898. She lived a little more than a year longer, joining him August 31, 1899. She lived to see all her children happily married. One must believe she was glad to obtain a well earned rest after a life well spent in doing the best she knew how, both in service to her God and to her fellow travellers. She was buried beside her husband in the family plot, in the Brigham City cemetery.

*(page 3) According to the Forsgren Company Journal, Denmark was only one day old. (KDS)
 
Hansdatter, Maren (I95516)
 
134 Aarhus, Ning, Viby, Viby By, hus, 8, 1, FT-1845, B2775
Name: Age: Marital status: Position in household: Occupation: Birth place:
Rasmus Rasmussen 32 Gift husmand og klodsmager Thiset, Aarh.
Jensine Kyberg 28 Gift hans kone Aarhuus
Søren Rasmussen 7 Ugift deres søn her i Sognet
Caroline Rasmussen 3 Ugift deres datter her i Sognet
Magdalone Pedersdatter 18 Ugift tjenestepige Torrild, Aarh.
Ane Joh. Lehrmann 69 Enke husmoders moder, som af dem forsørges Aarhuus 
Rasmussen, Caroline (I92067)
 
135 ABOVE PHOTO: Current-day view of Greenford, Middlesex, England, birthplace of John. Gardiner, John (I83181)
 
136 Abraham Katzenbach was baptized on 8 May 1763 in the Reformed Dutch Church, Albany, N.Y.

Abraham did not go to Quebec with his father. He stayed in NY and fought with the Vermont Militia. (He lived near the border of Vermont) He is listed in the Daughter's of the American Revolution Patriot Index. Abraham Katzenbach/Catosaback/Catezeback is listed in "Soldiers, Sailors and Patriots of the Revolutionary War" found at the Family History Library in Salt Lake City. The entry says he was born in 1763 and was a Corporal, VT. in Capt. Dater's Co. in 1781.

Revolutionary War Rolls for the State of Vermont contain two payrolls that list Abraham Catzeback. The first is for Oct 17, 1781 for answering an alarm and serving 4 days and the second is for 13 days service as Corporal Abrm.Catosaback beginning on Oct 23, 1781. He would have been 18 at the time. Also in his unit were Sgt. Jacob Rosenberger and Private Peter Rosenberger. They were likely related to his future wife Anna Rosenberger. She had brothers with those names.

Abraham married Anna Elizabeth “Betsy” Rosenberger (b. 4 May 1762 in Hoosick, NY) about 1783 somewhere in New York state. She was the ninth and youngest child of Jacob Rosenberger (born 4 Dec 1720 in Niederzell, Germany) and Regina Zitzer (Zhzer) who was baptized 19 May 1718 in Poppenweiler, Germany.

Abraham and Anna had six children including three sons who moved to Ontario - John, our ancestor, Jacob and George. Abraham was a farmer in Rensselaer County.

We can see how the spelling of his last name changed over time. In the 1800 United States Federal Census , he is listed as Abraham Cauchebaw of Scaghtikoke, Rensselaer Co., New York.

In the 1810 United States Federal Census , he is listed as A. Catehapaw of Schaghticoke, Rensselaer Co., New York, United States. So the morphing of Katzenbach into Kotchapaw (and also Ketzback, Catchpaw, Katchback, Katchpaw, Ketchabaw and more) happened. Those that could write had English ears and they were trying to spell a German name.

Abraham and Anna died later than 1810. 
Katzenbach, Johannes (I83400)
 
137 According to Arnold Richard Borgersen, nephew, Louis and Mildred did not have children. Borgersen, Louis Emil (I78779)
 
138 Address: Copenhagen, Hovedstaden/Denmark
 
Kilde (S15)
 
139 Mindst én nulevende eller privat person er knyttet til denne note - Detaljer er udeladt. Kristensen, Inge Lis Gade (I28848)
 
140 Af Stensballegaard Rosenkrantz, Erik T. (I3348)
 
141 AFN: PLAC 11KR-NNL/
 
Sargent, Edward (I32143)
 
142 AFN: PLAC M739-RM/
 
Bradstreet, Humphrey (I32106)
 
143 AKA General Francis Tanner
AKA General Francis Tanner 
Tanner, Francis (I27483)
 
144 Albert & Elvira Tanner
http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=image&guid=a6f3dc83-01c6-4fd7-9057-5c21 8fd62c94&tid=27655098&pid=2135 
Tanner, Albert Sylvester (I30190)
 
145 Alexander Armstrong, 2nd Laird of Mangerton, Called "The Young Laird" of Mangerton Castle, is understood to have been originally built by a Knight of the Baron De Soulis of Norman descent, named Maiger, and held by him before the year 1250. Source-Ford lectures delivered in the University of Oxford by G.Y.S. Barrow F.B.A. 1977.

geni.com
Alexander of Scotland
Also Known As: "Prince of Scotland"
Birthdate: January 21, 1264 (19)
Birthplace: Jedburgh, Roxburghshire, Scotland
Death: January 17, 1284 (19)
Hermitage Castle, Hawick, Roxburghshire, Scotland
Place of Burial: Dunfermline, Fifeshire, Scotland.
Immediate Family:
Son of Alexander III, King of the Scots and Margaret of England, Queen consort of Scots
Partner of Rebecca of Flanders
Father of John Alexander
Brother of Margaret of Scotland, Queen of Norway and David of Scotland, Prince Of Scotland
Occupation: Prince of Scotland 
Armstrong, Alexander (I74331)
 
146 Alexander was in court at Jedbuggh for stealing cows 28 Feb. 1394/95, Bks. of Adjournal Ms. Justiciary Office vol. 1493-1504 ff. 25 p. 2; p. I & 2. ; 27, p. I.

was 6th Lord in 1482. Source-Chart of the Ten Lords of Mangerton Source- Armstrong House of Langholm,

Item 2. Source- Chronicles of the Armstrongs by James L. Armstrong Book 929.242,Ar57a & 929.2 "717" Chart of the Lords of Mangerton, Scotland.

Alexander had seven sons, that represent the seven branches of the Oak Tree that is used on the Armstrongs Shield or Coat of Arms. He was called ' Ill Will's or Andro' All of the following are the same source. Compiled by W.L.A.(Az.)

There is a difference between being a Laird, leader of a clan and a Lord. It is NOT the same thing. A Laird can be a Lord but being a Laird is not being a Lord.

In the following table we have named the Ten Lairds of Mangerton -- the Laird being the head man or leader of the family or clan, who lived in the castle called Mangerton, situated in Liddesdale on the Liddal River in Scotland.

1st Laird -- Siward Beorn (1020 to 1055) - A Dane by birth or descent.

2nd Laird -- Alexander Armstrong - Known as the Young Laird of Mangerton.

3rd Laird-- Name not known (probably Alexander)

4th Laird-- Archibald Armstrong

5th Laird-- Thomas Armstrong - 15th century. 1. Alexander Armstrong (6th Laird) 2. John Armstrong of Whithaugh 3. Will Armstrong of Chingils 4. George Armstrong of Ailmure

6th Laird-- Alexander Armstrong 1460 1. Thomas Armstrong (7th Laird) 2. John Armstrong of Gilnockie 3. Christopher Armstrong of Langholm 4. George Armstrong 5. Alexander or Andro Armstrong 6. Robet Armstrong 7. William Armstrong

7th Laird -- Thomas Armstrong - Died 1548 or 1549. 1. Archibald Armstrong (8th Laird) 2. John Armstrong of Tinnisburn 3. Richard Armstrong of Dryup 4. Thomas Armstrong 5. Simon Armstrong Tinnisburn

8th Laird -- Archibald Armstrong - 1548 or 1549 to 1558. 1. Simon Armstrong (9th Laird) 2. Ninian Armstrong 3. Rowe Armstrong

9th Laird -- Simon Armstrong - 1558 to 1583. 1. Archibald Armstrong (10th Laird) 2. Ungle or Hingle Armstrong 3. Simon Armstrong of Runchbach

10th Laird -- Archibald Armstrong - 1583 to 1610. Archibald Armstrong, the tenth and last Laird of Mangerton, remained as the Laird until 1610, when he and twenty-four of his followers were charged with plundering an enemys property. They were ordered to appear before the Council but failed to do so. Shortly thereafter, Archibald was expelled from his lairdship.

Notes: Armstrong Clan: Ted Armstrong, 'Thyme', 7 Riverside,CANONBIE, Dumfresshire, SCOTLAND

Notes: Tradition says that anyone who bears the name of Armstrong is descended from the original Scotsman John, who on seeing his King unhorsed hurried to place him on his saddle. The king unsheathed his sword and said, "I dub you Armstrong."

Notes: Alexander's official title was: Alexander 6th Laird of Mangerton Castle.

Notes: Ive seen an interest again regarding the history of Johnnie Armstrongof Gilnockie. The only stories I can tell are ones that will be retold,and my references are few, but most of the credit should go to George MacDonald Fraser, author of The Steel Bonnets. When Joe returns to Gateshead hemay have some corrections to post to this!

Notes: Someone posted a notion that Johnnie may be considered as king of the Armstrongs. I do not intend in the least to admonish that thought, but such case is hardly true. Son of a chief of the clan, yes that is a fact. Alexander Armstrong, 6th Laird of Mangerton Christ was laid in I believe> was the father of our Johnnie of Gilnockie. Johnnie had one older brother however that would be Thomas. There is some argument regarding the correctness of history pertaining to the succession of the Lairdship of Mangerton. I know you have a question right now,and I'll answer it as best I can. There is no connecting succession currently. The last chief of the clan, by my references, faded into Cumbria in the early 17th century, and since then there has been no clan chief. 1 2
 
Armstrong, 6th Laird of Mangerton Castle Alexander Christie (I74312)
 
147 Alice Fleet Smart was born on January 1, 1844 in Pont De l’Arche, Eure, France. Her parents, Ann Hayter and Henry Fleet, were from England but were working in France teaching school at the time of Alice’s birth.
In 1846, Alice’s mother and father divorced. In 1847, Ann met and married Thomas Sharott Smart, who was also an Englishman living in France. Thomas legally adopted Alice, her older sister Mary Ann, and younger sister Louisa.
The Smart family immigrated to America in 1848 and settled in St. Louis, Missouri, where two children, Charlotte and Maria, were born to the family. While living in Missouri, the Smart family came into contact with members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, leading to their conversion and baptism in 1851.
When Alice was 8 years old in 1852, her family decided to cross the plains to Utah to join the main body of the church. The family joined the Allen Weeks Company, departing from Kanesville, Iowa (present day Council Bluffs, Iowa) on 13 July 1852. The Smarts traveled by wagon and ox team and made the journey without any major incidents beyond the expected hardships of the journey, arriving in Salt Lake City, Utah on 12 October 1852.
Alice and her family settled in American Fork, where her father engaged in the tannery business. Two children were born to the family here, Thomas and Sarah. Around 1856 or 1857, the Smart family moved to Provo, where two more children were born, Eliza and Frances. Finally, in about 1861, Thomas was asked by church leaders to join a group going to settle the Cache Valley in what would become southern Idaho. He moved his family to what would become Franklin, Idaho, where the last two members of the family, William and Mary, were born.
In Idaho, Alice met William Jared Pratt, the son of William Pratt and nephew of LDS church apostles Parley P and Orson Pratt. Alice and William married on 1 December 1863 in Preston, Idaho. Alice and William lived the rest of their lives in southern Idaho, where they had ten children - William, Ann, Thomas, Parley, Alice, Jared, Wealthy, Lucy Katie, and Leonidas - all of whom lived to adulthood save two. In 1873, with Alice’s blessing, William married Charlotte Parkinson as his second wife, with whom he had three children.
Alice worked hard raising children and running her household in a frontier settlement. She served as a midwife. She was a faithful member of her church and served as president of the Relief Society at Wilford, Idaho for many years.
In her later years, after Jared’s death, Alice lived with her son William in Burley Idaho, where she died on 17 February 1920. Alice was buried in the Albion City Cemetery. 
Smart, Alice Fleet (I88804)
 
148 Alpine skier, director, producer. He won the Alta Snow Cup in Sun Valley, Idaho, when he was only 14 and was the dominant American alpine skier in the 1940's. He was a member of the U.S. Olympic ski team in 1948 and was U.S. Olympic ski team captain in 1952. He was also a veteran, serving honorably in the Navy during World War II, and in the Korean War. After his skiing career ended, he moved to Los Angeles and went into the film and television business, working as a producer, production manager, director and assistant director on many prominent films, including "The Great Escape" (1963) and "Bonnie and Clyde" (1967), for which he served as assistant director. In 1969, he was elected to the U.S. National Ski Hall of Fame. Reddish, Jack Nichols (I95332)
 
149 Although a birth record has not been found, Sarah's relationship to Henry Brooks is verified by his will. Her marriage to John Mousall is in Woburn, Massachusetts marriages. She is also named in the will of her father-in-law, Dea. John Mousall Sr.
John and Sarah (Brooks) Mousall had no children. 
Brooks, Sarah (I79165)
 
150 Alva was the third child in a family of nine children born to Leo Alva Snow and Lula Pendleton. Alva grew up in St. George and after attending school through High School and Dixie College he served a mission to the Eastern States. After his mission he attended Utah State University where he met and married Jean Olsen. After college they moved to Roosevelt, Utah where they raised their family of 10 children. Alva was active in church serving as Bishop, Stake President, Mission President of the Seattle Washington Mission and then Temple President of the Vernal Temple. Most of his life he made a living operating tire store(s), He enjoyed ranching and owned and operated a farming operation in Roosevelt and a ranch in Bennett. With his sons Lynn & Gordon he started Alva Snow Construction, which built many homes, subdivisions and buildings in the Roosevelt area. Snow, Alva C (I92517)
 

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